My Son-In-Law Borrowed My Car Without Telling Me And Had A Minor Accident What Do I Do?

My Son in Law Borrowed My Car Without Telling Me and Had a Minor Accident 

My son-in-law recently borrowed my car without telling me, and the result was a minor accident. There are a few steps you should take in this situation. First, obtain a police report. Then, consider a private settlement if the accident was not your fault.
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The legality of letting someone drive your car without telling you 

If you let a person drive your car without telling you, and they are responsible for a minor accident, you can be held responsible for the damages. This is a misdemeanor under Virginia Code SS 46.2-301.1(E). The penalties are not the same for each state, but they can include fines of up to $2,500 and up to 12 months in jail. In addition to paying for the damages, you may have your license suspended. 

The legality of letting someone drive your car without your permission is complex, but the insurance company usually assumes permission. In any case, it is important to know how much your insurance coverage covers, as a non-permissive use may not be covered. 

Liability for accidents caused by uninsured drivers 

Whether your son-in-law is using your car without your permission, you are still liable for any car accidents caused by uninsured drivers. This is not always easy to prove and may leave you paying for damages if the car is involved in an accident. Depending on your car insurance policy, you might be excluded from it, or your premiums will increase significantly. If you let someone drive your car, you risk a bad driving history and a high insurance rate. If you have a poor driving record, you may also be held responsible for the damage. 

Luckily, most states have laws that limit your liability to a certain amount. For example, if you’re in an accident and the other driver is uninsured, you will only be responsible for the first $15,000 of the damages. However, if you were the one driving without insurance, or if you were drinking and driving, you may not be covered at all. 

Obtaining a police report 

You may have been surprised to learn that getting a police report for a minor car accident is possible. Many people assume that the police will not attend minor car accidents. While this may be true, even minor car crashes can result in lawsuits. A police report is a written account of the accident scene, including the vehicles involved, weather conditions, and any injuries to the drivers. If you are involved in a car accident and want to prove liability, you should obtain a police report as soon as possible. 

Considering a private settlement if the accident is minor 

Many people are concerned that filing a claim with the insurance company will increase their insurance premiums, but the truth is that there is often a much better way to handle these situations. Private settlements are an excellent way to avoid the insurance company’s wrath. By choosing a private settlement, you can avoid the rate increase and even avoid being declared uninsurable, a common problem for accident victims. 

When considering whether to file a private settlement after a minor car accident, it’s important to remember that a private settlement requires the agreement of both parties. In some cases, the other driver may prefer an insurance claim. Even a small accident can cost thousands of dollars, so it’s important to remember that the other driver’s insurer has the right to file a claim. 

My Son-In-Law Borrowed My Car Without Telling Me And Had A Minor Accident What Do I Do? | Montag Law